4 Step Classroom Discipline / Behaviour Management Plan

This topic contains 17 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Roman Davis 2 weeks, 1 day ago.

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  • #60510

    Archived Message
    Participant

    4 Step Behaviour Management Plan

     

    Here is one teacher’s classroom discipline / behaviour management technique.

    Each child has a wooden peg with their name on it.

    Each peg is placed around the green smiley face – this is the positive behaviour station.

    If a classroom rule is broken, the child’s peg is moved to the yellow smiley face, this is like a first warning.

    On a second warning the peg moves to the red face which means things are starting to get serious.

    The last blue face means a trip to the office to visit the Principal.

    At the beginning of each day all children start afresh on the green smiley face.

    This technique was used with my son’s year 1 class. For the first term, the pegs were a big ‘deal’, and it seemed to have the desired effect. My son’s teacher admitted that she was pretty tough with it for the first term.

    From about the second term, pegs very rarely went any further than orange, as children began to settle and understand the environment and behaviour expectations.

    I thought this was quite simple and effective without being overwhelming to understand for the children and without being too ‘negative’.

    Cheers

    Donna

  • #60511

    K-3 Member
    Member

    When using the stop light program in a smaller special needs class, I used photos of the students that where placed on the chart using velcro. This was used as a whole school program, and worked most of the time. If the same behaviour occurred more often I would place a label with the behaviour that needed to be worked on next to the picture. In cooling off they would be reminded by pointing to what was going to happened next. We only had three colours not four, green amber and red. In the red zone would have the label of consequences that would need to be considered if you don’t stop the behaviour.

    Anonymous

  • #60512

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I saw this idea on another website and will be incorporating the 4 step idea into my class this year.

    I have incorporated the traffic light system (green, yellow, orange & red). The only difference I have made is that I have used photos of the children’s faces instead of pegs, as I found this easier in a hurry than having to fiddle around with pegs (and for the students who can’t yet read their name -ESL).

    I also have next to each colour what it represents:

    Green -GREAT -doing a wonderful job
    Yellow – COOL DOWN – Warning
    Orange – SLOW DOWN – Time out (buddy class or at a different seat)
    Red – STOP – Consequence (stay in at recess etc).

    I found having what the lights meant helpful for release/Non-contact teachers and for relief or casual teachers.

    Anonymous

  • #60513

    K-3 Member
    Member

    Do you have a picture of the traffic light system?

    Anonymous

  • #60514

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I’m working with a group of pre-schoolers in a long daycare centre. They need to be reminded of the rules now and then as appropriate for this age group. The 4 step idea will make it far more interesting and effective than telling them off dryly with words. And you don’t need a huge budget to do it!

    Thanks.

    Olivia

  • #60515

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I used raffle tickets with a difficult class and caught good behaviour. They wrote names on tickets and put them into a daily draw and at the end of the week 3 children got a treat from the lucky dip box or a balloon animal (which I learnt to make). This was the best received idea I have ever used. You can give out as many as you want and it rewards the forgotten good ones. I also had the stop think do traffic light in use in the classroom for negative behaviour.

    Anonymous

  • #60516

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I am moving to a new school in September and I will definitely try this. It’s so simple.

    Deborah Mckenzie

  • #60517

    K-3 Member
    Member

    t’s very good, and i think it’s work. thank you so much

    angel_indonesia

  • #60518

    K-3 Member
    Member

    It’s so easy and visual – and a casual can pick this up and run with it too. I find some reward systems overly complicated – I will get children almost arguing about how the system works (when they are informing me) because they don’t fully comprehend it. Keep it simple. It’s a fantastic idea.

    Anonymous

  • #60519

    K-3 Member
    Member

    We’re implementing a similar system K-6. We’ve made a chart in coloured stripes and move the childrens names across the chart from left to right.

    If they stay in the left hand column then they have been “on track” for the day and they earn a star. After 10 stars they are rewarded. The reward varies depending on the age of the class.

    The older grades are having some additional computer time. I have a 1/2 and I’m going to give them an icypole or similar.

    As the system becomes entrenched we may look at modifying the rewards, however, we all believe that it is important to recognise the children who are always doing the right thing.

    Karin

  • #60520

    K-3 Member
    Member

    Hi there , In answer to your question, yes it is a school in the Redland’s Shire – not sure about the older teacher though (hee hee!!!!!)
    Cheers

    Donna

  • #60521

    K-3 Member
    Member

    hello is this a year one classroom in the redland shire with an older woman teaching?

    Anonymous

  • #60522

    K-3 Member
    Member

    Sure this would work well up to the primary level.
    But I’m truly worried about the older students,grade 4 to 10. I’m lost. Any ideas please!!!

    Anonymous

  • #60523

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I use a similiar idea and have so for the past 3 1/2 years with 3/4 classes and a year 6 class. Instead of pegs I used the students names (laminated) with velcro for moving. Last year I added a reaching for the Stars chart to encourage more positive behaviours.

    Anonymous

  • #60524

    K-3 Member
    Member

    I use something similar in my Grade 2 class in Canada. We use a stop light (green, yellow, orange and red). All the children start the day on green(appropriate behaviour). If they disobey a rule/routine they move to yellow (warning). If they disobey a rule/routine again, they move their clip to the orange circle (a note goes home to their parents)and if disobey a rule/routine again, then they move their name to the red light and then they are to visit the Principal’s office. At the end of the day, the pegs return to the green light ready for the next day when the students all have a fresh start. It works very well! We also use “Gotcha’s” or “Bravos”. When the children are obeying rules/routines without being asked, they get a slip of paper that says “Gotcha” or “Bravo” on it. They write their name on the slip of paper and put it in the “Gotcha” or “Bravo” bin. At the end of the week the teacher draws out three students names. Those students get to choose a reward/prize from the Treasure Box. The combination of the stop light and the Gotcha’s works well to maintain good behaviour in the class without the teacher having to raise their voice at all.

    Mudie

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    Roman Davis
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